Tag Archive: sick


My Dog Eats Grass, Does That Mean He’s Sick?

By: Dr. John Crumley DSC_0303-001

The short answer is no; eating grass does not mean your dog is sick. Eating grass is a normal behavior in dogs. A study revealed that the majority of dogs eat grass routinely (79% of the dogs studied ate grass daily). The same study revealed less than 20% of dogs that ate grass vomited after eating the grass. This means that grass is a poor inducer of nausea and/or vomiting. So dogs eat grass normally and it doesn’t make them vomit enough to give support to the claim that dogs eat grass to make themselves vomit.

I’ve always heard dogs ate grass when they feel sick to intentionally cause themselves to vomit and I never questioned it until

images (1)veterinary school. Why is this “wives tale” so pervasive that most of us have accepted it as truth if it has been proven to be false? Nobody really knows, but consider this explanation. Grass if indigestible by dogs, so if grass is ingested it will remain in the stomach longer than digestible items. If the majority of dogs eat grass daily, when they vomit for any reason there is a strong possibility there will be grass in the vomitus. We see grass in the vomit and jump to a simple, but wrong conclusion that the grass caused the vomiting. I think over the years we have come to the erroneous conclusion that the grass causes vomiting just because it is present in the vomitus so often.

So if your dog eats grass, don’t worry so much. However, if you dog is vomiting please have him seen by one of our veterinarians to try and determine the real cause of the vomiting.

Does a wet nose mean my dog is healthy? If it is dry is he sick?

By: Dr. Jackie Pulver Dr. Jackie Pulver

Most dogs have a cold, wet nose-we have all felt this when they nuzzle our hand for a pet. The nose is wet for multiple reasons. Inside of the nose there are glands that secrete watery fluid to help cool the dog through evaporation. The nose is also an area that a dog sweats from 250_Seven_s_Nose(much like the foot pads). Tears travel from the eyes through the nasolacrimal duct to the nose and provide moisture. The moisture in the nose may also make the dog more sensitive to odors. Dogs also constantly lick their noses!

Dogs will have different moisture content to the nose that varies day by day, hour by hour, dog by dog. The nose may be wet and cool one moment, then warmer and drier the next. The nose wetness (or lack thereof) also changes with the humidity.

A dry nose in a dog is therefore not an indicator of health in our pet. We cannot accurately determine fever from a nose. If Golden Retriever puppyyour dog has a dry nose but is otherwise showing no signs of illness, this may be a normal nose for your dog at that time. If your dog’s nose is cracked, scaling, bleeding, or your dog is having any changes in his normal routines or behaviors, he should be examined by your veterinarian.

I’m a Survivor

I Survived Parvo

Hi my name is Jake and I am a parvo survivor ! I was brought into Baring Boulevard Veterinary Hospital for not eating or drinking, vomiting, and lethargy. I had no history of vaccines. After spending 3 days in the hospital with intense fluid therapy and medication I was able to go home. Here I am 5 weeks after I finished my treatment for my vaccines and am as healthy as a pup 🙂

Most cat owners don’t know it, but lilies are lethally toxic to cats.  In fact, they’re so poisonous that a cat can suffer fatal kidney failure just from biting into a lily leaf or petal, licking lily pollen from its paws, or drinking water from a vase with cut lilies in it.  All members of the Lilium group produce a chemical—present in all parts of the plant—that can damage cat kidneys, but Easter lilies, stargazer lilies, and Asiatic lilies seem to be the most hazardous. (Calla lilies and peace lilies are not of the Lilium group, and are harmless to cats.) Some cats appear to be more susceptible than others to lily toxicity, and the severity of the resulting kidney failure also varies from cat to cat. Some poisoned cats recover with minimal therapy, while others require costly dialysis to live long enough for the kidneys to repair themselves.   If you think your cat may have chewed on or ingested lily, don’t wait for signs of illness— seek veterinary care immediately.